• accord 2002

    The 40th Accord was formed due to a desire to commemorate the anniversary of civil rights demonstrations that led to the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

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  • 1985

    The Annual Commemorative Breakfast honoring Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. began.

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  • Fort Mose Map 1996

    The Fort Mose Historical Society formed to promote and support the importance of Fort Mose in American History. Former Mayor George Gardner issued a proclamation declaring June 2nd “Fort Mose Historical State Park Day”.

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  • Lincolnville - Copy_800x533 1979

    The Lincolnville Festival began as a street event where local musicians got together to play jazz and raise money for the restoration and preservation of the Lincolnville area. The Lincolnville Festival has become a yearly tradition in St. Augustine for ethnic food, good music and fun, fun, fun.

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  • Civil-Rights-Act-Passed July 1964

    Hotel owner James Brock was photographed pouring acid into a pool of where whites and blacks were demonstrating. This photograph was on the front page of newspapers around the nation and played a key role in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

    President Johnson signed the Civil Rights bill into law.

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  • Jimmy Brock and MLK June 1964

    Dr. King, among others, was arrested in St. Augustine for attempting to have lunch at a downtown establishment.

    Muriatic acid was poured into a pool by Jimmy Brock, while occupied by demonstrators fed up with the segregation and discrimination at the Monson Motor Lodge.

    Civil Rights Act was passed by the US Senate.

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  • Peabody-Images_683x637 April 1964

    Leaders begin to worry that the Civil Rights Bill would be shut down in the US Senate, so they enlisted supporters of the movement to aid with this battle. Among these supporters were two white women; Mrs. Peabody, the mother of the governor of Massachusetts and Mrs. Burgess, wife of the Episcopal Bishop of Massachusetts. These ladies were arrested during a sit-in, which brought national news coverage to St. Augustine.

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  • MLK and Abernathy March 1964

    The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and its president, Dr. Martin Luther King’s were asked to come to St. Augustine by local Civil Rights leaders to aid in the ongoing struggles.

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  • 1964 Feb 1964

    Gunshots were fired in the occupied house of Dr. Robert Hayling, who’d been instrumental in the civil rights movement.

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  • Sept. 1963-Ku Klux Klan Sept 1963

    Four African-Americans were brutally beaten after being discovered spying on a rally of Ku Klux Klansmen. The Klansmen knowing the different professions of these black men focused their assault on ensuring that these men were incapable of serving in their occupations anymore.

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  • Woolworths_1024x683 July 1963

    Samuel White, Willie Carl Singleton, JoeAnn Anderson Ulmer and Audrey Nell Edwards became known as “the St. Augustine Four”, after a “sit-in” at the local Woolworth restaurant. They were arrested for attempting to order food at the counter that was for whites. They were sent to jail, then reform school for six months.

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  • Youth Demonstrators June 1963

    Protests began by the Youth Council of the local chapter of NAACP in downtown St. Augustine in a continued fight for equality.

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  • excelsior 1924

    The Excelsior School was built. This was the first public high school for blacks

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  • 1916-St. Benedict's School 1916

    Three of the teaching nuns at St. Benedict School, Sister Mary Thomasine Hehir, Mary Scholastica, and Mary Beningus, were arrested for breaking a law that made it illegal for white teachers to teach black students.

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  • St. Paul AME Float 1904

    St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church building was erected. Civil rights rallies were held here during the time of demonstrations.

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  • 1902 1902

    John Papino, a black councilman, is shot by the white town marshal at a city council meeting and begins the end of black office holders until the 1970s.

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  • 1918-Florida Normal Building 1918

    Florida Normal became St. Augustine’s first college (a black school), later named Florida Memorial and was located in St. Augustine until 1968.

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  • WAR AND CONFLICT BOOKERA:  CIVIL WAR/BACKGROUND: SLAVERY & ABOLITIONISM 1889

    Fredrick Douglass was a featured speaker at a business on St. George St.

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  • 1869

    Authorization is received for the Freedmen’s Bureau to build an African-American School for $4,000.

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  • Lincolnville_1200x800 1866

    Lincolnville was established by freed slaves, on the peninsula between Maria Sanchez Creek and San Sebastian River, formerly known as “Little Africa.” Lincolnville is well known and the property is highly sought after for the rich Victorian architecture.

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  • Emancipation Proclamation_800x533 1863

    President Abraham Lincoln signs the Emancipation Proclamation (the proclamation was read in the Old Spanish Cemetery (now referred to as Freedom Park)

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  • 1820-Slave Market 1824

    The slave market was built in now downtown St. Augustine, to barter slaves.

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  • 1812-Black Milita-Needs to be doctored, Also from 1770 1812

    During the War of 1812, a black militia was rewarded land grants by the Spanish governor for saving St. Augustine from attack.

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  • 1796-Jorge Biassou 1796

    Jorge Biassou, a black Spanish general, comes to St. Augustine and is the one of the top paid executives of that time. Biassou was instrumental in the 1790’s with the revolt of the slaves in Haiti.

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  • Antonio Proctor_1024x597 1743

    Antonio Proctor was born in San Domingo, a slave. His last name was Propinos, until he gained his freedom in St. Augustine. Antonio was well known as an Indian interpreter for the first American governor of Florida.

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  • 1738-Fort Mose Alternate Image-Credit Florida Museum of Natural History 1738

    Fort Mose founded. This community was authorized by Governor Manuel de Montiano, creating the first emancipated African settlement in the United States.

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  • Castillo de San Marcos_800x637 1695

    The walls of the Castillo de San Marco are completed; work on the interior continues. 11 Africans were paid to help build the Castillo according to payroll records preserved in thearchives.

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  • 1672-Construction of Castillo de San Marcos 1672

    The Castillo de San Marco’s construction began

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  • Map of St. Augustine 1593 1606

    Records show the first black child being born in St. Augustine in 1606. It’s probable that there were black children born before that time here, but records haven’t been able to validate this, as of yet.

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  • Pedro-Menendez 1565

    It’s widely known that St. Augustine was founded in 1565 by Pedro Menendez. What’s often overlooked is that Africans were with Menendez during this exploration. Many of the foundational endeavors during this time were aided by blacks. These Africans came as craftspeople, sailors, guides and explorers. Africans played a significant role in helping to establish and uphold St. Augustine. Slavery existed in this area for many years, in different forms.

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