Foot Soldiers’ Monument

Located in the Plaza de la Constitucion just south of the Slave Market in downtown St. Augustine, this monument was dedicated in 2011 to commemorate the heroes of the civil rights movement. The keynote speaker at the dedication ceremony was Hank Thomas, one of the original “Freedom Riders,” who grew up in St. Augustine.

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29.892481,-81.311453

Dr. Alexander H. Darnes Statue

This statue, honoring Dr. Darnes in St. Augustine, once in the garden of the location where he grew up as a slave in the Segui-Kirby Smith House, is now located in the courtyard of the St. Augustine Historical Society Library. Following emancipation, he attended college and became the first black physician in Florida. He also mentored author and civil rights leader, James Weldon Johnson.

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271 Charlotte Street, St. Augustine, FL

Andrew Young Crossing

This sidewalk leading into the Plaza de la Constitucion in downtown St. Augustine is marked by bronze footsteps. They represent where civil rights leader, Andrew Young, received his first beating during the Civil Rights Movement in June of 1964.

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Corner of St. George Street and King Street, St. Augustine, FL

Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue

While many cities have streets named after Martin Luther King, Jr., this street which runs through the heart of Lincolnville, was actually walked on by him. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. walked this street during the last major leg of his campaign that helped pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964-one of the two great legislative accomplishments of the movement.

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M L King Avenue, St. Augustine, FL

Major Argrett Memorial

This was the first memorial to honor a black man in the white part of town. Legendary horse carriage driver, Major Argrett was pictured in the National Geographic magazine in 1966 after a tour he gave to one of the assistant editors. This plaque, located on the seawall just south of Castillo de San Marcos, honors his life and many dedicated years as a carriage driver.

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29.894453, -81.310973

Dr. Robert B. Hayling Place

The street (formerly named Scott Street), was renamed in 2003 to honor Dr. Robert Hayling, a leader of the Civil Rights Movement in St. Augustine, and called “The Father of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.” His house at 6 Dr. Robert B. Hayling Place was shot up by racists in 1964, killing the family dog and narrowly missing his pregnant wife.

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6 Dr. R. B. Hayling Place, St. Augustine, FL

Solomon Calhoun Center

A principal at the Excelsior School, Solomon Calhoun was a star athlete in his youth. After finishing high school at twenty-one years of age, he went on to earn a bachelor’s and master’s degree at Florida A&M University. He was selected in the 1930s as a Pittsburgh Courier All American, the first from Florida A&M University. This community center located at 1300 Duval Street is named in honor of him.

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1300 Duval Street, St. Augustine, FL

McMillan Street

Located north of State Road 16, cutting over US1, this road is named after Alexander McMillan, a former slave who came to St. Augustine in 1876. He worked as a gardener, farmer, carpenter, janitor, and bellman to save money and purchase land. When the value of the land made it beneficial to sell it, Mr. McMillan was restricted by rules that stated it could be bought by “any white person over twenty”, but “should not be sold or resold to any member of the Negro race or any association of Negroes or to any to which they are entitled to membership.” Mr. McMillan and his family chose to remain on the land until his death in 1937.

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Mc Millan Street St Augustine, FL

Willie Galimore Community Center

A recreational facility built to honor Willie “The Wisp” Galimore, who was both a star basketball and football player at St. Augustine’s Excelsior High School. Following high school, Mr. Galimore went on to attend Florida A&M University and was a three-time All American in football. He played for the Chicago Bears in the National Football League after college, but was killed in a car accident at age twenty-nine. His last visit to St. Augustine was to take part in the 1964 Civil Rights demonstrations. His home is now marked on the Freedom Trail at 57 Chapin Street in West Augustine.

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399 Riberia Street, St. Augustine, FL

Otis A. Mason Elementary School

This school is named after Otis A. Mason, who is a member of the Sports Hall of Fame at his alma mater, Florida A&M University for baseball, as well as an honoree of the St. Johns County Sports Hall of Fame. Mr. Mason served two terms as the only black person ever elected as the Superintendent of Schools in St. Augustine. Following retirement, he was a leader of the Fort Mose Historical Society and Excelsior Museum.

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207 Mason Manatee Way, St. Augustine, FL